Source: CVDaily Feed
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An announcement last last week from Utah public health officials that an elderly resident died from plague was alarming in that it was the first such diagnosis in Utah in six years.

Plague is a rare, life-threatening illness.

“Plague is usually spread by rodents that become infected,” said Leona Goodsell, Nursing Director at the Bear River Health Department. “Fleas that might be on the rodents can come in contact with pets or humans. Then the pet or the human becomes infected.”

The Utah Department of Health said risks are generally highest in rural and semi-rural areas, including campsites and homes that provide food and shelter for various ground squirrels, chipmunks and wood rats, or other areas where you may encounter rodents.

“It is treatable with antibiotics. We recommend anybody with symptoms that has been around an animal or that has been out in the wilderness to seek medical attention,” said Goodsell.

She said preventative measures begin with reducing rodent habitat around your home, work place and recreational areas. That includes removing brush, rock piles, junk, cluttered firewood and possible rodent food supplies.

Anyone with concerns is encouraged to contact the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources —

An announcement last last week from Utah public health officials that an elderly resident died from plague was alarming in that it was the first such diagnosis in Utah in six years.

Plague is a rare, life-threatening illness.

“Plague is usually spread by rodents that become infected,” said Leona Goodsell, Nursing Director at the Bear River Health Department. “Fleas that might be on the rodents can come in contact with pets or humans. Then the pet or the human becomes infected.”

The Utah Department of Health said risks are generally highest in rural and semi-rural areas, including campsites and homes that provide food and shelter for various ground squirrels, chipmunks and wood rats, or other areas where you may encounter rodents.

“It is treatable with antibiotics. We recommend anybody with symptoms that has been around an animal or that has been out in the wilderness to seek medical attention,” said Goodsell.

She said preventative measures begin with reducing rodent habitat around your home, work place and recreational areas. That includes removing brush, rock piles, junk, cluttered firewood and possible rodent food supplies.

Anyone with concerns is encouraged to contact the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources — wildlife.utah.gov — if you see an unusual number of dead prairie dogs, squirrels, or rabbits in any given area.

— if you see an unusual number of dead prairie dogs, squirrels, or rabbits in any given area.

By Staff